Monterey and Carmel

We were up and out early on Saturday. We took the scenic route to Monterey along the coast. Monterey is as lovely as I had imagined. We went straight to the marathon expo at the Portola Hotel. It was not difficult to find, just follow the Boston Marathon jackets and race tech tees. There was a line of people waiting to get their photo taken in front of a Big Sur International Marathon sign. I thought, what’s the big deal? Well I didn’t realize at first that the sign had the names of all the runners. Of course I jumped in line. Thankfully the names were in alphabetical order. Carlos gets his photography skills from me!

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We wandered down to the wharf in Monterey. We took some photos and saw a few sea lions.

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We had time to kill before we could check into our hotel so we decided to drive to Carmel to scope out the finish line area. We found the finish area easily and then went straight to the beach. It was beautiful out, but a bit chilly. Carlos and Orlando played soccer. Carlos made friends with JD the black lab.

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I lounged and watched people perfect their selfies and social media posts. You cannot believe how long it takes a group of four women to coordinate a simultaneous jump for joy and have it captured on camera. It actually takes less time to do that than it does for boyfriend to photograph girlfriend throwing her scarf in the air, over and over and over again. How cute??!

We discovered we were very close to one of the entrances to the 17 Mile Drive around Pebble Beach. If you are into gorgeous scenery, slow drives, and imagining what it would be like to live in stunning homes then this is well worth the $10. Orlando and I loved it. We dream of one day building our own seaside home on our land in a small beach town in Mozambique. Of course it will be nowhere near as grand as the homes we saw. We stopped at many of the landmarks on the ocean and that gave Carlos the opportunity to climb on the rocks so he was happy too.img_2532-1

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Back in Monterey we checked into the Munras Inn. The room was lovely, but we would have preferred a vacation rental that offers a little more space. Lodging is expensive in the Monterey/Carmel area. For anyone planning their trip to the area specifically for the marathon, plan early and check out VRBO, Home Away, etc. in Pacific Grove, Monterey, and Carmel. Had I started planning a little earlier we might have found a property at a more reasonable price, although these areas are pricey in general. Our hotel was a little less than a mile to the Marriot where I would catch the bus for Big Sur on marathon morning. It was an easy walk and with so many runners out I wasn’t worried about being alone. My family was very appreciative that I didn’t wake them at 3:45AM to drive me.

I thought about attending the pasta dinner, but the only seatings were at 4:30 and 5:30PM, but we were still out in Carmel. We found a local Italian place. I had a sub-par dish of spaghetti. It was a bit disappointing because running a marathon is really my only excuse to enjoy a big bowl of pasta.

There is a ritualistic process that takes place the night before a marathon. First I lay out my clothing for the race. I always put the safety pins in the bib unfastened. I set up all of my necessities. Most importantly I set as many alarms as I can especially when a race requires a 2:40AM wake up call. I was terrified I wouldn’t wake up on time for the race.

Then I was asleep in a matter of minutes once I got into bed. It was a beautiful, relaxing day, but I was excited and anxious about the marathon.

 

Big Sur International Marathon 

I can’t remember if my alarm actually went off or if I woke up on my own at 2:40AM. I slept like a rock, but then I was wide awake. Marathon mornings don’t usually start quite this early, but nothing about this marathon was typical. First let’s back track to last summer.

A friend, fellow runner, and Pacific coast native wrote to me about the Big Sur International Marathon lottery for first timers. I threw my name in and figured it was a long shot. It took me three years to get into Chicago. I don’t play money lotteries, but perhaps I should because I got into Big Sur too. Of course I had heard of this notorious marathon and it was on my running bucket list. I knew a little bit about it namely that it offered spectacular views of the Pacific coast line. My family and I had never visited this part of the country so the race provided us with a wonderful travel opportunity. I am more than happy to run a marathon if it means visiting and experiencing a new place.

Back to the crack of dawn on April 30th. I buzzed about the hotel room quietly disturbing no one. I showered, dressed, and ate half of my pre-marathon bagel with banana and peanut butter. Fueling for this race was interesting. I always try to simulate race day on my long runs, but I often left the house between 5-6AM for a long run and that would have required a 1-2AM wake up. I had a plan in my head and fortunately it worked out.

Then there was the question of what to wear. I was expecting a much cooler temperature in the early morning, but it wasn’t bad at all. I left the hotel at 3:45 and walked a little less than a mile to the Marriot to catch a bus to the starting area in Big Sur. I was wearing a long sleeve over my T-shirt and I had another shirt in my bag along with a pair of gloves. I never needed the second shirt. I tossed the old long sleeve I was wearing at the finish line. I was extremely grateful for the gloves prior to the start because my hands were cold.

Around 3:45AM I joined throngs of runners on the street in the dark all headed to various bus pick up areas around downtown Monterey. Starbucks was open. The Marriot lobby was a buzz of brightly colored running gear as people gathered to wait for the buses. I was expecting a bumpy ride on a school bus, but was instead pleasantly surprised by a very comfortable motor coach bus. I boarded and before I knew it we were on the road.

I chatted easily with the guy seated next to me. We discovered we were the same age and running Big Sur for the first time. He was from San Francisco and ran with a large running club there. He has run the SF marathon more than once. He has also run Grandfather Mountain Marathon, touted as America’s toughest marathon. He will be one of only 40 participants in this year’s Inca Trail Marathon in August. He directed me to Weather.com’s list of the World’s 15 Toughest Marathons. San Francisco is number 15 and Big Sur is number 13. So many races, so little time and money!

We arrived about a half mile from the starting area and we were guided through the dark by the flashlights of kind volunteers who graciously gave their time to help in the early morning hours. I moved along listening to the hum of conversations around me. It is really hard to describe how bizarre this all would have been to me about 10 years ago. I am not sure where I imagined life would take me, but this certainly was not it. Yet here I was just hours away from beginning my 8th marathon, trekking along in the dark with hundreds of fellow runners in a quiet forest on the coast of California with half a bagel, chia water, and a stick of body glide in my bag. As foreign as this all would have been to me 10 years ago it now makes perfect sense.

The starting area was busy. People everywhere. Lines forming for port-a-potties and bag check. Coffee, tea, hot cocoa, bananas, etc. offered to all of the runners. I found a spot a bit away from the crowd and settled down with a small cup of coffee for the nearly 2 hour wait. The coffee helped warm my hands and it actually tasted great. I finished my bagel. Soon I was chatting with a couple of women next to me. One had done 24 marathons and was training for her second Iron Man triathlon. The other was running her 3rd marathon. The conversation flowed effortlessly until it was time to consider entering the long queue for the toilets. It’s all about timing! I chatted with another woman in line. Whenever I mentioned I was from Massachusetts, the first question was “did you run Boston.” I can’t wait to someday answer yes. Big Sur hosts the Boston to Big Sur challenge for runners who want to do both races. This year the races were about two weeks apart, but in previous years runners had only 5 days rest between Boston and Big Sur.

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By the time I lined up at the start there were less than 10 minutes to go. The sky was clearing and I was treated to my first glimpse of the tranquil surroundings.

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The gun went off and I watched as the first wave started. My group was next. I fell into a comfortable pace heeding all the advice I had read. Don’t go out too fast. Save your energy for the hills. Enjoy the peacefulness of the forest. Soak it all up.

The one thing I was most nervous about was running without music. For many runners this probably sounds absurd, but it is how I have always run. I did do parts of my long training runs without music. I admit that I often don’t even really hear what’s playing, but it helps keep me motivated and the beat keeps my feet moving. Big Sur race instructions state:

Because the safety of all of our participants and volunteers is our first priority, we ask that you leave your headsets at home and instead let the incredible scenery, music we provide on the course, and your fellow runners serve as your motivation and inspiration. 

I read one previous race participant’s blog post who had similar concerns and he wrote that he only put on the music for the long climb to Hurricane Point. I figured I would bring my headphones and do the same. I was instantly entertained by the excited  runners around me. I picked up bits and pieces of conversations in many languages. Then as the crowd thinned out I enjoyed the soothing sounds of nature, bubbling brooks, birds, a distant waterfall maybe. It was beautiful. I just ran. No pressure, no time goal, no urge to do anything more than what I was doing in the moment.

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Around the 10K mark the forest gave way to coast line. My photos do not do the views justice.

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The expansive ocean vistas that sprawled out to my left were stunning. To my right were vast green caverns and cliffs. It was breathtaking and when you didn’t think it could be more beautiful you would crest a hill and be treated to an even more incredible view.

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Don’t forget to look behind was another common piece of advice from previous participants. It is not something you typically do during a race, but it really is a must in the Big Sur marathon. Appreciating the views from behind gives you a unique perspective of the course.

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There was a light playfulness to this race as well. The mile markers were all sponsored and featured funny commentary and photos. They were all different and became one more thing to look forward to as I ran.

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I knew about the long roughly two mile climb to Hurricane Point that begins after mile 10. I saw it laid out ahead long before I reached it.

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The music of the Taiko drummers at the foot of Hurricane Point energized me as I started up the ascent, but once the music was out of earshot I put my headphones on to keep me pumped up for the climb. The weather was ideal on race day. There was a little headwind as I pushed myself up to Hurricane Point. It was a long climb, but when you are looking out at the most beautiful scenery it doesn’t seem quite as difficult.

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I knew that before I even reached the halfway point I would begin to hear the melodic tune of the infamous Bixby Bridge piano player.

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I took off my headphones in preparation. When the bridge came into sight and the sweet strains of the music touched my ears it was magical. I couldn’t see the grand piano or Michael Martinez, the man playing it, but the music and the view moved me to tears. I wasn’t prepared for such a rush of emotions. I felt like I was on top of the world, literally.  In that moment I knew it was a privilege to be a part of this marathon.

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The second half of the course is a true test of strength and endurance as you tackle hill after hill.

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My shins seemed to cry each time I started on a downhill. I stayed at a slow, but steady pace and power walked the steep hills. I paused here and there to snap photos. I stopped at nearly every aid station to refill my handheld and to slather on pain relief cream on my left calf. It seized up during my final long run the week prior and despite tending to it with massage, foam rolling, bio freeze, rest, etc. all week, I felt a twinge of tightening early on in the marathon. The cream helped a lot.

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At the mile 23 aid station a woman asked about the famed strawberries and was told there were none this year. What?!! A collective frustrated sigh could be heard from all the runners who overheard. Fortunately the aid volunteer was mistaken and about a 1/4 mile ahead we were treated to the most delicious, juicy local strawberries. I was in heaven. The strawberries redirected my mind off of the discomfort in my legs and onto the happy party in my mouth. Everyone including myself seemed to perk up.

The hills never seemed to let up and as I stared ahead at the hill jutting from the mile 25 marker I reminded myself that it all I had to do was put one foot in front of another. I was almost there. I could do this. I turned around briefly to remind myself of how far I had come to get to this point, and then I powered up that hill.

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This is not a spectator race. Because of the road closure there is no way for friends and family to cheer the runners along the course so I knew I was very close to the finish when I finally heard the spectators. I saw Orlando and Carlos and the finish line. My eyes teared up again. I remember crossing the finish line of my very first marathon 5 years ago and it has been the same feeling each time…awe, disbelief, pride, and gratefulness. I did it! I completed the Big Sur International Marathon. It was a truly amazing experience and a life changing journey from training to finish.

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Marathon Monday

The third Monday in April is Patriots’ Day in Massachusetts and Maine. The holiday commemorates the April 19, 1775  battle of Lexington and Concord.  Since its inception in 1897, the Boston Marathon has always been held on Patriots’ Day, but it wasn’t until 1969 that Patriots’ Day was moved from April 19th, the actual day of the battle, to the third Monday in April. Now the holiday is now more commonly known as Marathon Monday.

I didn’t grow up amongst runners yet I knew about the Boston Marathon from a young age. I am a Massachusetts native after all. In college I had the opportunity to work setting up barriers along some of the roads towards the end of the marathon. My friend’s aunt and uncle own the company that organizes the finish line and many other components of the race.  I spent race day at the finish line. Despite being the furthest thing from a runner at that time, I found the experience quite incredible. However, at no time during that day did I even once contemplate crossing that or any other marathon finish line. It would be another 11 years or so before I was bit by the running bug and then another 4 years before I would run my first marathon at Disney.

I have never run the Boston Marathon. Since 1970, entrance into Boston has required runners to meet a qualifying time also known as a BQ. For some simply achieving the BQ is a feat in and of itself, and does not necessarily guarantee entry into the race.

Boston Marathon Qualifying Standards
Age Men Women
18–34 3hrs 5min 3 hrs 35min
35–39 3hrs 10min 3 hrs 40min
40–44 3hrs 15min 3 hrs 45min
45–49 3hrs 25min 3 hrs 55min
50–54 3hrs 30min 4 hrs 0min
55–59 3hrs 40min 4 hrs 10min
60–64 3hrs 55min 4 hrs 25min
65–69 4hrs 10min 4 hrs 40min
70–74 4hrs 25min 4 hrs 55min
75–79 4hrs 40min 5 hrs 10min
80+ 4hrs 55min 5 hrs 25min

There are two other points of entry for interested non-qualified runners. The Boston Marathon charity program allows entry to approximately 6,000 runners who have raised a minimum of $5,000. A small percentage of runners are invited to run by sponsors, running clubs, media, or other promoters.

The Boston Marathon inspires me as a runner and a human being. To witness the determination and strength of the varied runners on the course is as notable in the elites as it is in each and every participant in the race. To see the power in the arms of the wheelchair athletes as they literally blow by you is awe inspiring. To watch the determination and resolve of the mobility impaired runners including blind runners and runners with prosthetic limbs reminds me that my challenges are not insurmountable if they can overcome theirs.

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Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez lost a limb in Afghanistan, runs the Boston Marathon carrying the American flag the entire way

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For me the marathon itself has become the antithesis of the word can’t. I was a self-described non-runner for much of my life. I would proudly declare “I can’t run” as though saying it somehow exempted me from doing it. I said I can’t in relation to many things in my life for a long time. When I am running a marathon and my body starts to say it can’t go any further something else takes over and keeps it going. A long distance run is much more of a mental challenge than a physical challenge. When you shift your thinking it’s amazing what you can tolerate and overcome. Somewhere in the last 10 years I stopped saying I can’t.

I will run Boston one day. Qualifying would be a momentous achievement for me. Right now I am running an average pace far slower than what I would need to qualify in my age bracket, however, running has certainly taught me that I am capable of going far beyond my comfort zone so I am not ruling out a BQ in my lifetime. I will at least shoot for the moon and if I don’t reach it by a certain age then I will do the next best thing and raise money for a very deserving charity.

For now I am honored to cheer for all of the Boston Marathon runners. If their name is written somewhere on them I shout it. I clap and holler. Many bring tears to my eyes. Each one of those runners has a story of how they got to the starting line. Oh how I would love to know them all. This year Carlos and I went with my friend and her daughter. She is originally from Framingham and knew exactly where to go. We set up a few hundred feet before the 10K marker. It was a great spot. We saw each wave from the wheelchairs to the mobility impaired and on to the elite groups, but perhaps the most exciting waves are those that come after the elites, the everyday runners, like myself who dared to dream big. What it must feel like to realize such a dream. I soak it all up as I try to find answers in their faces and expressions. I will be there one day too!

 

It is a sea of runners for nearly two hours.

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They are still full of pep as they near mile 6.2 although this year the temperature was quickly rising towards 80 degrees and some looked affected by the heat already.

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We watched until the fourth and final wave began to thin out. Then we headed home feeling nothing but inspired.

Big Sur Marathon Training

I am 5 weeks away from running my 8th marathon. Despite a very unpredictable New England winter, I have really enjoyed this training.  At the onset of training I determined my goals for this marathon as have done for each marathon. This was a bit different because I have no time goal. Big Sur is an experience from all that I have read about it. Runners make their way from Big Sur to Carmel along scenic Highway 1. Everything I have read about it from blog posts to articles imparts the same advice…look around, take in the scenery, and enjoy the experience. That is exactly what I plan to do. Of course I will run and do my best, but I will stop to take a few photos as well. I got into the race through a marathon for first timers so this is likely a once in a lifetime opportunity for me and I want to remember it well.

Like most of my marathons this will be a family vacation as well. We will be spending our first weekend in Monterey for the marathon and then we will spend a week in San Francisco. It’s a first for all of us.  We are definitely open to recommendations?

My training began back in January. After the Manchester City Marathon in November, I continued running regularly and maintained a longish run each week of 8-10 miles. The winter was mild up to that point and I wanted to take advantage of the decent weather to run as much outdoors as possible. After the New Year I began increasing mileage almost immediately with a 12 mile long run. Big Sur is a very hilly course so there has been some hill work on shorter midweek runs. Although I am not focused on a particular pace for this marathon some speed work has been incorporated into my training. I love the variation of runs throughout the week because it keeps it interesting.

I have been working with a running coach for the last 4 marathons. I feel silly even saying that because I am not a professional athlete, but honestly working with a coach has been such an incredible experience for me. For the first three marathons I trained myself loosely following Hal Higdon’s plans. I think I did quite well for someone who never engaged in sports prior to taking up running. Working with a coach after my Achilles injury was important. I was nervous and anxious about becoming injured again. I was also slower and heavier causing frustration with myself and running. It was helpful to have someone guiding me through those ups and downs as I came back from the injury and began marathon training again. I had always trained by miles and the first thing my coach did was plan my runs by time. This lifted the pace pressure right off of my mind. The next big change she made was starting my training plans on Monday rather than Sunday. Seems insignificant doesn’t it? Well it made a significant difference in how I was able to plan my week because suddenly it allowed me the flexibility to do my long run on either Saturday or Sunday for that training week.

Having a coach also allows me to push myself out of my comfort zone. I love reporting back that I was able to hit the prescribed paces in a speed workout or that I accomplished a challenging hill repeat workout. It’s also great to have someone help me figure out why something might not be working. I learn so much about my own abilities as a runner and I am picking up skills that will help me coach others too.

Tomorrow morning I will set out for what will likely be my longest long run at 22 miles. I ran 20 last week. My long runs have (knock on wood) been going really well and I have been incredibly lucky with the weather. The 17 miler was a bit insane. We had snow a few days before and the roads in some places were still in bad conditions. I ran from my house to my mom’s house three towns away. The route is a rather busy one which I thought might work to my advantage because I assumed the roads would be clear. The roads were a mess, no shoulders to run in and sidewalks were untouched for the most part.  I had to stop at train tracks while a train passed. It was a disaster. I felt as though people driving by were annoyed by me running and I was annoyed by the splashes of wet slush flying up at me every now and then.

Overall I’ve enjoyed unseasonably “warm” winter weather. There have been some spring-like days recently. There has been a great deal of sunshine and some beautiful scenery. I have trained in freezing temperatures, extremely windy conditions, and rain. I have only done a handful of my runs indoors on the treadmill. Hopefully the next few weeks of training are just as awesome because the taper weeks will be here very soon.

I tried to capture some of the scenery from this training. These were all posted previously on Instagram. Each one brings back a memory of the run.

Happy spring! Nice peaceful run on this gorgeous day. #bigsurmarathontraining2017
Scenes from my favorite running spot . The weather  was almost 60 degrees. I loved the contrast of the warmer air against the snowy scenery.
20 miles, hills, snow, ice, darkness, clouds, quiet, a little bit of sun ☀️ #winterrunning #bigsurmarathontraining2017
Sights from my 20 miler on 3/19/17. I ran two towns away up and over “the mountain” as it is referred to around here. That is Mt. Tom in the bottom left. Although I did not run the actual mountain, the road to the town below is quite long and steep. 
Today is one of my favorite races, the Holyoke St. Patrick's 10K. Good luck 🍀 to 1000s of runners! As always the luck of the Irish is with them as the sun peeks out of the clouds. It couldn't be more perfect running weather. I'm just finishing up an easy run before tomorrow's 20 miler. #bigsurmarathontraining2017 #winterrunning
A short 6 miler on the day of my favorite 10K. I decided not to run it this year in order to focus on marathon training, but I really missed it. I’ll be back next year!
So much for an early spring #bigsurmarathontraining2017 #winterrunning
Another nice day for an outdoor run.
The run that almost wasn't today. Many excuses-cold, snow, no school for Carlos, a ton of paperwork but the sun came out, the grandmother came over, and I hit the road. There's just something about running over bridges I love. #winterrunning #bigsurmarathontraining2017 #noexcuses
I love running over bridges.
It's hard to believe that after a day like today snow is on its way tomorrow. It was really windy but temps were in the 50s. Thankfully today was long run day. #workfromhomeperks #bigsurmarathontraining2017 #winterrunning
A lovely run along the bike trail turned into a powerful workout.
Morning run sun #marathontraining #winterrunning
An early morning run near Carlos’ school after dropping him off

Happy #internationalwomensday  I honored myself by going for a lovely lunchtime run on what was supposed to be a rainy day. Instead it was all blue skies, sun, and a tinge of spring. #bigsurmarathontraining2017 #winterrunning
Barely a cloud in the sky
When there is no path ahead create your own. I swore I wouldn't do another spring marathon and struggle through winter training, but here I am back at it. #bigsurmarathon here I come. This is a bucket list race and an opportunity I couldn't pass up. #winterrunning
On Instagram I wrote: When there is no path ahead create your own. I swore I wouldn’t do another spring marathon and struggle through winter training, but here I am back at it.
Why is the wind never at my back?!! #winterrunning #bigsurmarathon
It was super windy out on this day and I swear no matter which way I turned at the reservoir I had the wind in my face!

Looks cold but feels like spring. Taking the path less traveled on my way to #bigsurmarathon #winterrunning
I didn’t feel much like running on this day. I forced myself out the door at lunchtime. The run was horrible, but there is always a lesson in the run.

Long run day #bigsurmarathon #winterrunning
Taken during a fueling stop on one of my early long runs. That is the Connecticut River going by.

Time to get to bed. I have a very early wake up call before I hit the road. After watching the big rain cloud with 60-90% chance of rain on tomorrow’s weather forecast, it now show only a 20% chance of rain and a sun peeking out from behind the cloud. I will take it!

Hartford Marathon Training – Week 3 – Phase 2

Anyone else feeling like this lately?

Anyone else feeling like this lately?

My training is broken up into blocks. Phase 2 is a 5 week block. Phase 2 of training is also preparation for the Bridge of Flowers 10K on August 8th.

  • Monday, 7/20– 45 t0 60 minute Recovery Run

I ran 6.01 miles in 1:01:21 (avg pace 10:12 min/mile). I ran at Mount Holyoke College for a change of scenery. It was very humid, but I felt good despite the heavy mileage over the weekend.

  • Tuesday, 7/21– 60 to 75 minute Pace Booster Run: Run 20 or 30 minutes at steady state pace in the middle of the run (up Skinner Mountain for example)

It was a very frustrating work day. I only had about 50 minutes before picking up Carlos at camp. I slammed the computer shut, drove the 15 or so minutes to Skinner and tore up the mountain as fast as could. I ran 3.64 miles in 36:22 (avg pace 9:58 min/mile). 

  • Wednesday, 7/22 – Cross Train or Yoga

I did nothing. 

  • Thursday, 7/23 – Speed work: 10 minute warmup, 10 by 1 minute hard/1 minute easy, 10-15 minute cool down.

I love these workouts. I ran 4.92 miles in 48:44 (avg pace 9:54 min/mile).

  • Friday, 7/24 – Cross train or Yoga

I did a short run and a little hill work with two friends at lunch time. We ran 2.82 miles in 38:38 (avg pace 13:43 min/mile). 

  • Saturday, 7/25 – 120 minutes long run with last 3 miles pushing the pace

I  ran 12.20 miles in 2:00:40 (avg pace 9:53 min/mile). This was a really strong run for me. I literally ran 120 minutes away from my house and had my husband pick me up after. Towards the end of my run I was treated to this gorgeous sight. 

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  • Sunday, 7/26– Cross train or yoga

I enjoyed a fun afternoon biking with Carlos and our friends. We rode 15.29 miles along the bike trail in Northampton. I also did some stretching and foam rolling.

Not a perfect training week, but not a bad week either.

Hartford Marathon Training Week 4

This was a rough week for me and I was not quite on target with the plan. I had a really difficult time waking up early most days. I am striving to get back to my 4AM wake up time, but I have not been successful. Late summer nights combined with working even later hours to fit in afternoon activities with Carlos makes it a challenge to wake up early. I’m doing the best I can and I keep trying.

For the first 4 weeks of training I’m following these pace recommendations:

Recovery runs: 10:00-11:00 pace
Easy runs: 9:45-10:30 pace
Steady state runs: 9:15-9:45 pace (just do moderate effort up Skinner Mountain)
Stride workouts: 25 seconds at 8:30 pace building to 7:30 pace

  • Monday, 6/29 – 45 to 60 minute Easy Run

I ran 5.11 miles in 53:26 (avg pace 10:27 min/mile).

  • Tuesday, 6/30 – 60 to 75 minute Pace Booster Run: Run 20 or 30 minutes at Steady State Pace in the middle of the run (Up skinner mountain for example)

I was up at 5:10, but honestly I would really have to leave my house by 4:30 to get to the mountain, do the workout and drive home. I’m not big on driving places to run these days. It was easier when I had to travel that way to pick up Carlos at school. I’m going to have to figure something out because I don’t think Tuesdays are going to work for my Skinner Mountain run anymore. I thought about going in the evening after Carlos finished karate, but in the back of my head I knew that wasn’t going to happen.

Carlos and I went on a quick 3 mile bike ride before I had to get ready for work. I walked with Kate for an hour while the boys were in karate. I also did a 30 minute yoga class taught by Erin Motz on Do You Yoga before bed. 

  • Wednesday, 7/1 – Off or Yoga

I got up ready to run, but it was pouring, thundering and lightening out. I’m just not that adventurous. Carlos spent the day at Kate’s and they all went to the movies in the early afternoon so I took advantage of the time to do the Fartlek Workout I missed from last week.

10 to 20 minute Warm-Up + Fartlek Workout: 8 to 10 times 1 minute at slightly faster than 5K effort with 1 minute recovery jog + 10 to 20 minute Cool-down 

For the above workout I ran 4.6 miles in 45:08 (avg pace 9:49 min/mile). It was hot as hell out. I ended up running to Kate’s for water. She was going to bring Carlos and me back home, but the boys wanted to play longer so I ran home a slightly shorter way to get my car to pick up Carlos. My run home was more of a sweaty walk/run. I covered 3.35 miles in 38:53 (avg pace 11:37 min/mile). 

  • Thursday, 7/2 – 60 to 75 minute Easy Run

I worked Wednesday night so there was no chance for a morning run. Carlos and I biked 8.88 miles in the afternoon. Orlando got home late and having been awake for oh about 30 hours at that point I was too exhausted to run. 

  • Friday, 7/3 – 50 to 70 minute Easy Run with Stride Workout: 15 to times 25 seconds starting at 5K and progressing down to Mile race effort with 1 minute recovery jog between

I had the day off from work. My son’s friend slept over. I honestly don’t remember what my deal was that morning, but I did not run. We spent the day at Lake Wyola, came home quickly to shower and change and then went to my mom’s for dinner to celebrate my aunt’s 4th of July birthday because they were all heading to Florida the next day. After dinner we hightailed it back home for my town’s fireworks. We didn’t get home until after 10pm.  

  • Saturday, 7/4 – 80 minutes long run, push the pace a little harder on this one

Happy 4th of July! After a long, fun-filled day on Friday we all slept in on Saturday. Actually I got up to go for my run, but wasn’t feeling it yet so I lounged for a while. I finally went out and I nailed this run. I completed 8.16 miles in 1:20:19 (avg pace 9:50 min/mile). I pushed myself and had a great run. 

We had no major plans for the 4th other than our first family bike ride. Our first attempt was halted by the pelting down pour so we chilled out at Barnes and Noble for a while. Then we grabbed a few groceries and went home since it seemed like the rain was here to stay. Later in the day the sky cleared and it was gorgeous out so we drove back to the bike trail and rode 18 miles. Carlos did an awesome job!

Later we went to my favorite little restaurant Haymarket Cafe in Northampton. We stopped in at Herrell’s for ice cream after which was a freaking disaster. The girl handed me my ice cream, credit card and receipt all at once. I had no hands free, there was a huge line, and no place to move to organize myself. Carlos and Orlando were already outside. I went out and Orlando was trying to hand off his ice cream to Carlos because he didn’t like it. Not surprisingly as I was fumbling with everything in my hands my tiny scoop of vegan ice cream landed splat on the ground. Carlos and Orlando were on their way across the street so Orlando could get an ice cream elsewhere. I settled on a coffee. At some point the following Monday I realized I had lost my Discover card. Imagine that?!!! It probably landed next to my ice cream blog! It’s all resolved thankfully and no one tried using the card.

  • Sunday, 7/5 – Off or yoga

I just cannot seem to commit to yoga unless I’m going to a class. I also really wanted to make up for that run I missed on Friday.

50 to 70 minute Easy Run with Stride Workout: 15 to times 25 seconds starting at 5K and progressing down to Mile race effort with 1 minute recovery jog between.

I got up early and ran 5.76 miles in 57:20 (avg pace 9:56 min/mile). I’ve always done speed work on a treadmill so I’m really pushing myself out of my comfort zone and learning to do it on the road now. It’s a lot more challenging, but I love it (once it’s over!!).

Later in the morning Carlos and I met my college roommate for an awesome hike up Wachusett Mountain. It was a spectacularly sunny day. We got a little off track on the hike back so all in all I think we did almost 6 miles. Again I couldn’t be more proud of Carlos. He moaned and groaned a bit when we were trying to find our way back to the trail, but otherwise he was fine.

I just read back what I had written and I had to laugh about how I thought I had a rough week. All in all I ran a total of nearly 27 miles and moved my body for at least 62 miles if you count the bike riding and hiking. Damn I am active! Maybe I didn’t get up as early as I would like each day. Maybe I wasn’t on target with my training plan, but it designed to be flexible. I managed to get most of the runs in along with the fun cross training activities like bike riding and hiking.

Progress not perfection!

Post Marathon High

After the marathon I enjoyed spending time with my friends and family. First lunch with my family an BFF Amelia and her adorable family. Then I took a much needed long hot shower. We enjoyed a delicious dinner at the Farmhouse Tap and Grill. The energy in Burlington was electric. And yes I wore my medal the entire night!!

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On our way home from Burlington we stopped in the tiny state capital of Montpelier. We wandered around so I could stretch my achy legs! I really love Vermont and these two handsome guys.

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The Vermont City Marathon seemed to have the complete opposite effect that Montreal had on me. I have been on the post marathon high since I finished and it’s been two weeks. Maybe it’s the psychological effect of having another tangible goal in the near future. Since I registered for the New England Double I am automatically registered for the Hartford Marathon in October. Just knowing I have that race to run has made me incredibly excited about training. I usually take a few days off of running after a marathon in exchange for nice walks, not this time. I couldn’t wait to go for a run.

Part of that enthusiasm was due to my new running shoes. My sister had purchased a pair of Hoka One One running shoes while I was running the marathon. She suffers from neuromas in both feet. These are essentially caused by thick skin that grows over a nerve in the ball of the foot typically between the 3rd and 4th toe. They are very painful and she is almost always uncomfortable no matter what shoes she wears so she keeps a sharp eye out for comfortable footwear. She was raving about her new Hokas and offered to buy me a pair as a congratulatory gift . I really wasn’t in the mood to try on shoes, but she convinced me and after taking a little spin in the purple Hokas I was sold. My sister’s husband bought a pair as well.

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Team Hoka One One

I feel like I’m bouncing on air when I run and my toes don’t hurt anymore something I had come to believe was normal.

I have been running, made a return to strength training and I am hiking whenever I can. I have enjoyed a few trail runs too. I love them. They are so refreshing and tranquil. Moving more translates into eating better too. I’m not perfect, but the last couple of years have proved to me that I don’t have to be perfect to continue to achieve goals and overcome obstacles. I just have to keep trying and doing my best.

I emailed the following to my health coach and I think it sums up perfectly how I’m feeling and where I’m heading:

Vermont City lit a match under me. I have placed way too much emphasis on the outside of my body. I am never going to be a super model. I’m going to continue to age and my body will inevitably change through that process. After reading about the 92 year old woman who finished the San Diego Marathon I came to the conclusion that I would much rather still be running marathons when I’m 92 than be thin. I enjoy being active and in the middle of a race I could care less what I look like. However, I really would like to see what my body is capable of doing, how far I can push it and what else I can accomplish.